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Amenemopet-Pairy
imn
n
Aa15
O45
G40iD21
Z4
Y1V
ỉmn-m-ỉpt pꜣ-ỉry
"Amun is in the Luxor Temple,
The Companion"
Dynasty 18th Dynasty
Pharaoh(s) Amenhotep II and Thutmose IV
Titles Vizier of the South
Nomarch of Waset
Mayor of Thebes
Father Ahmose-Humay
Mother Nub
Spouse(s) Weretmaetef
Issue Paser
Burial KV48
For other pages by this name, see Amenemopet or Pairy.

Amenemopet-Pairy (transliteration: ỉmn-m-ỉpt pꜣ-ỉry, meaning: "Amun is in the Luxor Temple, The Companion") was an ancient Egyptian nobleman who served as Vizier of the South,[1] Nomarch of Waset and Mayor of Thebes under Pharaohs Amenhotep II and Thutmose IV of the Eighteenth Dynasty during the New Kingdom.

Family[]

Amenemopet-Pairy was the son of Ahmose-Humay and Nub. He was the cousin of Sennefer,[2] who is shown in Amenemopet's Theban tomb together with Sennefer's wife Senetnay. Amenemopet's wife was called Weretmaetef had they at least one son named Paser, who are depicted in his Theban tomb.[1]

Burial[]

Amenemopet-Pairy has a tomb chapel in TT29 in Sheikh Abd el-Qurna,[1] which forms parts of the greater Theban Necropolis. The actual tomb where he was buried was his KV48 rock-cut tomb in the Valley of the Kings. It is located near KV35, the tomb of Amenhotep II whom Amenemopet served.[3] He is one of only few non-royal individuals to have received the honour of burial in the valley.

References[]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Porter & Moss 1994, p. 45-46.
  2. Shirley 2013, p. 587.
  3. Bickel 2015, p. 235.

Bibliography[]

  • Bickel, S., 2015: Other tombs. In: Richard H. Wilkinson, Kent R. Weeks (editors): The Oxford Handbook of the Valley of the Kings. Oxford.
  • Porter, B./Moss, R.L.B., 1994: Topographical Bibliography of Ancient Egyptian Hieroglyphic Texts, Reliefs and Paintings: The Theban Necropolis, Part One: Private Tombs. Second Edition. Griffith Institute, Oxford.
  • Shirley, J.J., 2013: Crisis, Restructuring of the State: From the Second Intermediate Period to the Advent of the Ramesses. In: Juan Carlos Moreno Garcia: Ancient Egyptian Administration. Leiden/Boston.
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