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Amunet
Amaunet
imn
n
t
ỉmn.t
Amunet
Period of
worship
Old KingdomRoman Period
Cult center Thebes, Hermopolis (as Ogdoad deity)
Titles "The Hidden One"
Symbol(s) Red Crown
Association Protection, creation
Appearance Anthropoid, red crown, snake
Egyptian
equivalent(s)
Amun
Spouse(s) Amun

Amunet or Amaunet is an ancient Egyptian goddess who functioned as a protector of the king. Her cult center was situated at Thebes, in particular at the Karnak temple complex. She played a preeminent role in rituals associated with the royal coronation (ḫꜣỉ-nỉsw.t) and Sed Festivals (ḥb-sd).

In the Hermopolitan cosmogony, Amunet is the one of the eight deities of the Ogdoad representing primordial chaos from which the Primeval Mound appeared. She is coupled with the god Amun as her male counterpart and husband.

Iconography[]

At Thebes, Amunet was usually depicted anthropomorphically, as a female figure wearing the Red Crown (Deshret) of Lower Egypt. Typically holding a was-sceptre and ankh-symbol in her hands.

Like the other deities of the Ogdoad, her male form (Amun) was often depicted as a frog, or a frog-headed human, and her female form (Amunet) as a snake or snake-headed human. The snake head symbolised protection, healing, and regeneration, and was also possessed by the other Ogdoad females Nunet, Hehet and Keket.

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