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Deir el-Bahari or Dayr al-Bahri (Arabic: الدير البحري, "the Monastery of the North") is a necropolis on the West Bank at Thebes in Upper Egypt. It is considered part of the greater Theban Necropolis. The site of Deir el-Bahari contains mortuary temples and tombs, the majority of which date to the New Kingdom.

The first monument built at the site was the mortuary temple of Mentuhotep II of the Eleventh Dynasty. It was constructed during the 21st century BC.

During the Eighteenth Dynasty, Amenhotep I, Hatshepsut and Thutmose III also built extensively at the site. The mortuary temple of Hatshepsut being the largest and best preserved monument at the site, attracting many tourists.

Mortuary temple of Mentuhotep II[]

Main article: Mortuary temple of Mentuhotep II

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Mortuary temple of Hatshepsut[]

Main article: Mortuary temple of Hatshepsut

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Djoserakhet temple of Thutmose III[]

Main article: Djoserakhet temple of Thutmose III
The temple probably played an important role within the Beautiful Festival of the Valley, presumably being intended to receive the barque of Amun during its travels and thereby supersede the mortuary temple of Hatshepsut in one of its intended functions. However, beside the Djoserakhet temple, Thutmose III constructed his mortuary temple seperately to the east, closer to the floodplains of the Nile. Not much is known about the Djoserakhet temple, as it was abandoned after sustaining severe damage during a landslide in the latter Twentieth Dynasty. After that, it was used as a source of building materials and in Christian times became the site of a Coptic cemetery.

Stone chest[]

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Royal and non-royal tombs[]

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Royal cache[]

Bab el Gasus[]

List of tombs[]

Here follows a list of tombs discovered at Deir el-Bahari.

Theban tombs (designated TT)[]

Designation Owner Title Period
TT308 Kemsit King's Sole Adornment, Priestess of Hathor 11th Dynasty, Mentuhotep II
TT310 (MMA 505) Unknown Chancellor of the King of Lower Egypt 11th Dynasty
TT311 (MMA 508) Khety Treasurer of the King of Lower Egypt 11th Dynasty, Mentuhotep II
TT312 (MMA 509) Nespaqashuty Vizier, Governor of the town 26th Dynasty, Psamtik I and later
TT313 (MMA 513) Henenu Chief Steward 11th Dynasty Mentuhotep IIMentuhotep III
TT314 Horhotep King's Sealbearer of Lower Egypt 11th Dynasty
TT315 Ipy Vizier, Governor of the town, Judge 11th Dynasty, Mentuhotep II
TT316 Neferhotep Head of the Archers Early Middle Kingdom
TT319 (MMA 31) Neferu II Queen of Mentuhotep II 11th Dynasty
TT320 Royal cache Various 21st Dynasty
TT353 Senmut[1] High Steward[2] 18th Dynasty, Hatshepsut
TT358 (MMA 65) Ahmose-Meritamen / Nauny Queen of Amenhotep I / King's Daughter of Pinedjem I 18th Dynasty

Theban tombs (other designation)[]

Designation Owner Title Period
Bab el-Gasus 153 priests and priestesses of Amun Mainly Priest/Chantress of Amun 21st Dynasty
MMA 56 Ankhshepenupet[3] Chantress of Amun, Attendant of the Divine Adoratrice Shepenupet I 25th Dynasty
MMA 57 Khaemhor[3] Priest of Amun, Mayor of Thebes 26th Dynasty
MMA 59 Henuttawy Chantress of Amun 21st Dynasty
MMA 60 Djedmutiuesankh, Henuttawy, Henuttawy, Menkheperre, Neseniset, Tiye Chief of the Harem of Amun, King's Daughter, Chief of the Harem of Amun, God's Father, Chantress of Amun, Chantress of Amun (respectively) 18th and 21st Dynasty
MMA 506 Unknown 12th Dynasty
MMA 507 Slain soldiers 12th Dynasty
MMA 509a Babi (?) Vizier 11th Dynasty
MMA 511 Possibly Henu 11th Dynasty
MMA 514 Multiple burials 12th Dynasty
MMA 521 Unknown 11th Dynasty
MMA 801 Saiah, Djedbastet, Tiaset, Nayefenbu Wab Priest, Scribe in the Estate of the Divine Adoratrice of Amun, Chantress of Amun, none (respectively) 22nd Dynasty

See also[]

References[]

  1. "Theban Tombs". Archived from the original on 2016-11-09. Retrieved 2007-04-29.
  2. "Senenmut Project – 2004 Campaign". Archived from the original on 2007-09-27. Retrieved on 2007-05-02.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Winlock 1924.

Bibliography[]

  • Winlock, H.E., 1924: The The Metropolitan Museum of Art: The Egyptian Expedition 1923-1924. The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, New Series, Vol. 19, No. 12.
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