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Henuttawy
V28W10
t
N19
ḥnw.t-tꜣwy
"Mistress of the Two Lands"
Henuttawy F

Inner coffin of Henuttawy held at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. ©The MET

Dynasty 21st Dynasty
Titles Chantress of Amun
Lady of the House
Burial MMA 59
For other pages by this name, see Henuttawy.

Henuttawy (ancient Egyptian: ḥnw.t-tꜣwy, "Mistress of the Two Lands") was an ancient Egyptian noble woman of the Twenty-first Dynasty during the Third Intermediate Period.

Titles[]

Henuttawy was a Chantress of Amun and Mistress of the House.[1]

Family[]

Henuttawy's family remains unknown, but she appears to have been a regular citizen and not related to the royal family.[2]

Burial[]

Henuttawy was buried in MMA 59 at Deir el-Bahari. The tomb was previously carved for a man named Minmose. Her mummy and coffins were discovered there in 1923-1924 by an expedition led by Herbert E. Winlock. Henuttawy's mummy, coffins and part of the funerary equipment were taken to the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Mummy[]

Based on her mummy, Henuttawy died in her early 20s. Her body was not embalmed but simply wrapped in layers of linen bandages.[3] The mummy did not fit the coffin and the feet were damaged when the mummy was forced inside.[4]

References[]

  1. "Inner Coffin of the Chantress of Amun-Re Henettawy". The Met Museum.
  2. Kitchen 1986, p. 57.
  3. "Coffin Set of the Chantress of Amun-Re Henettawy". The Met Museum.
  4. Winlock 1924, p. 22-24.

Bibliography[]

  • Kitchen, K.A., 1986: The Third Intermediate Period in Egypt (1100–650 BC). Aris & Phillips Limited, Warminster.
  • Winlock, H.E., 1924: The Metropolitan Museum of Art: The Egyptian Expedition 1923–1924. The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, New Series, Vol. 19, No. 12.
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