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King's Wife (ancient Egyptian: ḥmt-nswt) also Royal Wife was an ancient Egyptian honorific title used to refer to the secondary wives and concubines of the Pharaoh. They were inferior to their husband's principal wife (or queen consort), they spent their lives in harem palaces and rarely held positions of high office. Secondary wives had chances to become the next queen consort after the latter's death. Their status was interrelated with that of their offspring.

King's Wife
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Secondary wives and concubines of the royal harem were also the king's personal entertainers, thus serving a very similar role to the pharaoh as Chantresses did to the deity of their priesthood. The key difference between them is that chantresses who served in a priesthood could have been married anyone, while entertainers in the royal harem primarily served as the king's consorts.

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Bibliography[]

  • Tyldesley, J., 2006: The Complete Queens of Egypt. American University Press, Cairo.
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