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Preceded by:
Djedkhonsiuefankh
High Priest of Amun
21st Dynasty
Succeeded by:
Smendes II
Menkheperre
Menkheperre Banishment Stela

Menkheperre depicted on the Banishment Stela.©

Reign 1051–998 BC (53 years)
Praenomen
M23
t
L2
t
<
R8U36D1 p
n
imn
n
>
Hemnetjertepienamun
"High Priest of Amun"
Nomen
G39ra
<
ra
mn
L1
>
Menkheperre
"Eternal Manifestation of Re"
Titles High Priest of Amun
Generalissimo
King's Son
Father Pinedjem I
Mother Duathathor-Henuttawy
Spouse(s) Isetemakhbit
Issue Smendes II, Henuttawy, Pinedjem II,
Isetemakhbit, Tjanefer (?),
Gautseshen, Psusennes, Hori,
Meritamen, Ankhefenmut
Died 998 BC
Burial Abydos
For other pages by this name, see Menkheperre.

Menkheperre (transliteration: mn-ḫpr-rꜤ, meaning: "Eternal Manifestation of Re") was the fifth High Priest of Amun of the Twenty-first Dynasty during the Third Intermediate Period.

Family[]

See also: 21st Dynasty Family Tree.

Menkheperre was a son of the High Priest of Amun Pinedjem I and his mother was Duathathor-Henuttawy, making him a grandson of Ramesses XI, the last ruler of the New Kingdom. His brothers include the later pharaoh Psusennes I and his predecessor and successor as High Priest; Masaharta and Djedkhonsiuefankh (respectively).

Menkheperre's only known wife was his niece, Princess Isetemakhbit, the daughter of his brother, king Psusennes I.[1] With her, and possibly other unknown partners, Menkheperre is known to have had at least five sons and probably four daughters.[2]

Issue[]

Biography[]

His father was Pinedjem I, who was the Theban High Priest of Amun and de facto ruler of Upper Egypt from 1070 BC. Around Year 15 or 16 of Smendes I, Pinedjem proclaimed himself pharaoh over Upper Egypt,[4] allowing his sons Masaharta, Djedkhonsuefankh and Menkheperre to successively succeed him as High Priest of Amun.

After succeeding his brother Djedkhonsuefankh as High Priest, Menkheperre took as his throne name the title of "High Priest of Amun", just as his great-grandfather Herihor had done. He is first attested in office on the Banishment Stela which records that the High Priest of Amun Menkheperre suppressed a local revolt at Thebes in Year 25 of Smendes I (ca. 1051 BC).[5]

Menkheperre is believed to have held the office of High Priest of Amun for over five decades.

Burial[]

Like his son Psusennes, Menkheperre was buried at Abydos, where a fragment of his granite coffin, usurped from a Ramesside owner, was found.[6]

See also[]

  • Banishment Stela

References[]

  1. Dodson 2004, p. 200-201.
  2. Dodson 2012, p. 64-65.
  3. Broekman 2010, p. 127.
  4. Taylor 1998, p. 1148.
  5. Kitchen 1996, p. 260.
  6. Dodson 2012, p. 65.

Bibliography[]

  • Broekman, G.P.F., 2010: The Leading Theban Priests of Amun. The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology, Vol. 96.
  • Dodson, A./Hilton, D., 2004: The Complete Royal Families of Ancient Egypt. Thames & Hudson, London.
  • Dodson A., 2012 (Revised 2019 edition): Afterglow of Empire: Egypt from the Fall of the New Kingdom to the Saite Renaissance. The American University in Cairo Press.
  • Kitchen, K.A., 1996: The Third Intermediate Period in Egypt (1100-650 BC). 3rd ed. Aris & Phillips, Warminster.
  • Taylor, J.H., 1998: Nodjmet, Payankh and Herihor: The Early Twenty-First Dynasty Reconsidered. In: Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress of Egyptologists. C.J. Eyre (ed.), Leuven.
Predecessor:
Djedkhonsiuefankh
High Priest of Amun
21st Dynasty
Successor:
Smendes II
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