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Merenptah
Merneptah
V28p
t
U6
n
A1
ptḥ-mr-n
"Beloved of Ptah"
Dynasty 19th Dynasty
Pharaoh(s) MerenptahSeti II
Titles King's Son
Father Merenptah
Mother Isetnofret II
Burial Unknown
For other pages by this name, see Merenptah.

Merenptah (transliteration: ptḥ-mr-n, meaning: "Beloved of Ptah") was a Prince of the Nineteenth Dynasty during the New Kingdom. He was probably the son of Pharaoh Merenptah and Queen Isetnofret II.[1]

Family[]

Prince Merenptah was probably the son of Pharaoh Merenptah and Queen Isetnofret II[1] and hence a grandson of Ramesses II and Isetnofret I. Prince Khaemwaset might have been his maternal-grandfather, depending on his mother's identity. Prince Merenptah had one older brother who succeeded their father as Seti II, as well as a younger brother named Khaemwaset and a sister named Isetnofret. The later pharaohs; Amenmesses, Siptah and Tausret have also been proposed as possible (half-)siblings.

Attestations[]

Merenptah is known from two statues of Senusret I − usurped by Pharaoh Merenptah − found at Tanis and Alexandria, and from three statue fragments from Bubastis.

Identification[]

It is possibly that he is the same person as either Pharaoh Merenptah or Seti II (his princely name was Seti-Merenptah).[2] This is supported by the fact that he wears a uraeus usually worn by pharaohs. However, the Senusret statues were usurped by Merenptah when he was already a Pharaoh, not a prince. Prince Merenptah's name and titles also slightly differ from those of both Pharaoh Merenptah and Crown Prince Seti-Merenptah, who used both his names as prince and pharaoh (like his ancestor, Seti I). This suggests that prince Merenptah was a seperate individual. It is possible that Merenptah's use of a uraeus stems from the power struggle between Pharaoh Merenptah's heirs following his death.[3]

Burial[]

The whereabouts of Merenptah's tomb and mummy remain unknown.

References[]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Dodson & Hilton 2004, p. 182.
  2. Dodson & Hilton 2004, p. 172.
  3. Dodson & Hilton 2004, p. 177.

Bibliography[]

  • Dodson, A./Hilton, D., 2004: The Complete Royal Families of Ancient Egypt. Thames & Hudson, London.
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