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Nakhtmin
Minnakhte
R22
R12
C8n
M3
Aa1
t
mnw-nꜥḫt
Dynasty 18th Dynasty
Pharaoh(s) Ay
Titles High Priest of Min
Overseer of the Works
Spouse(s) Mutemnub
Issue Ay
Burial Unknown
For other pages by this name, see Nakhtmin.

Nakhtmin or Minnakhte (ancient Egyptian: mnw-nꜥḫt, "Min is Strong") was a high official of the Eighteenth Dynasty during the New Kingdom.

Titles[]

Nakhtmin held the position of High Priest of Min during the reign of Pharaoh Ay. Nakhtmin was also Ay's Chief Architect for construction projects at the temple of Min at Panopolis as well as at the temple complex at Karnak.[1]

Origins and Family[]

Nakhtmin is believed to have been from Panopolis (modern Akhmim). His parentage remains unknown.

On a statue currently in the Brooklyn Museum, a dignitary named Ay is called High Priest of Mut, Second Prophet of Amun, and Steward of Queen Tey. His parents are recorded as Nakhtmin and Mutemnub, sister of Queen Tey.[2] Nakhtmin was therefore the brother-in-law of Queen Tey.

Attestations[]

Nakhtmin is first attested in the AT25 tomb of Vizier Ay at Amarna. He is also depicted in Ay's rock-cut chapel dedicated to the local deity Min, which overlooks the city of Panopolis and the surrounding area.

Identification[]

The priestly official Nakhtmin is often confused with a military official with the same name (Nakhtmin), since both Nakhtmin's share Panopolis as their hometown and both were closely involved in the royal court. They are however, clearly two seperate individuals, "as the priestly Nakhtmin has no military titles, and the military Nakhtmin has no priestly titles".[3]

Burial[]

The whereabouts of Nakhtmin's tomb and mummy remain unknown.

See also[]

References[]

  1. Dodson 2018, p. 104.
  2. Dodson & Hilton 2004, p. 155.
  3. Booth 2012.

Bibliography[]

  • Booth, C., 2012: Horemheb: The Forgotten Pharaoh.
  • Dodson, A./Hilton, D., 2004: The Complete Royal Families of Ancient Egypt. Thames & Hudson, London.
  • Dodson, A., 2018: Revised edition of 2009: Amarna Sunset: Nefertiti, Tutankhamun, Ay, Horemheb, and the Egyptian Counter Reformation. The American University in Cairo Press.
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