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Preceded by:
Shoshenq I
Pharaoh of Egypt
22nd Dynasty
Succeeded by:
Shoshenq IIa
Osorkon I
Manetho: Osorthon
Osorkon I

The Bust of Osorkon I from Byblos on exhibition at the Rijksmuseum van Oudheden in Leiden. ©Khaemwaset

Reign
922–887 BC (35 years)
Praenomen
M23
t
L2
t
<
raS42xprraU21
n
>
Sekhemkheperre-Setepenre
Powerful Manifestation of Re,
Chosen of Re
Nomen
G39N5
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imn
n
N36
V4Aa18iD21
V31
n
>
Osorkon-Meryamun
Osorkon, Beloved of Amun
Horus name
G5N5
E2
M3
D40
U6O33
Kanakhte-Meryre
Strong Bull, Beloved of Re
Nebty name
G16saA
a
xpr
r
WA53wr
r
U16Y1
Z2
Seaakheperuwerbiaut
He Magnifies Manifestations
and is Great of Marvels
Golden Horus
G8A24F23d
r
A24pD
t Z1
Z3Z3Z3T14
Nakhtekhepeshderpedjut-9
Strong-armed one who has
Repelled the Nine Bows
Legacy
Father Shoshenq I
Mother Karomama A
Consort(s) Maatkare C, Tashedkhonsu,
Shepensopdet A
Issue Shoshenq Q (=IIa?[1]), Iuwalot,
Smendes III, Takelot I
Died 887 BC
Burial Unknown, probably at Tanis.
Monuments Per-Sekhemkheperre
For other pages by this name, see Osorkon.

Sekhemkheperre-Setepenre Osorkon (transliteration: wsỉrkn) was the second Pharaoh of the Twenty-second Dynasty during the Third Intermediate Period.

Family[]

Osorkon I was the eldest son of his predecessor Pharaoh Shoshenq I by Queen Karomama, who was the daughter of Psusennes II. Through his father, Osorkon was a descendant of the Great Chiefs of the Ma (Meshwesh tribe) who had a Libyan origin. His brother Iuput became High Priest of Amun at Thebes, while another brother Nimlot was an army general.

Osorkon I's sons Shoshenq Q, Iuwalot and Smendes III successively became High Priest of Amun at Thebes, while the youngest known son eventually became pharaoh as Takelot I.

British scholar Kenneth A. Kitchen expressed the view that Pharaoh Shoshenq IIa might be identical to Osorkon I's son, Shoshenq Q.[1] However, Shoshenq Q's decendents do not make reference to his kingship and instead only refer to him as a King's Son. Furthermore, no mention of Osorkon I's name was preserved on any ushabtis, jars, jewelry or other objects within Shoshenq II's tomb. This situation would be improbable if this king was indeed Osorkon I's son.

Dates and Length of Reign[]

Osorkon I probably succeeded his father Shoshenq I within a year of the latter's successful 923 BC campaign against the Philistines and the kingdom of Israel.

While Manetho gives Osorkon I a reign of 15 years in his Ægyptiaca, this is most likely an error for 35 years based on the evidence of the second Heb Sed bandage, as Kenneth Kitchen notes. Osorkon's highest known date is a Year 33 date found on the bandage of Nakhtefmut. This date can only belong to Osorkon I since no other early 22nd Dynasty king ruled for close to thirty years until further down to Osorkon II.

Burial and Succession[]

The location of Osorkon I's tomb and mummy remains unknown. Although Osorkon I was thought to have been directly succeeded by his son Takelot I, it now seems likely that another ruler intervened, namely Shoshenq IIa, and possibly even another, Shoshenq IIb.

References[]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Kitchen 1996, p. 117-119.

Bibliography[]

  • Kitchen, K.A., 1996: The Third Intermediate Period in Egypt (1100–650 BC). 3rd edition. Aris & Phillips Ltd.
Predecessor:
Shoshenq I
Pharaoh of Egypt
22nd Dynasty
Successor:
Shoshenq IIa
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