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Preceded by:
Gemenefkhonsubak
Pharaoh of Egypt
Non-dynastic
Succeeded by:
Taharqa
Padibastet III
Pedubast, Pedubastis
Padibastet III

Part of a basalt statue bearing the titulary of Padibastet III at Memphis. (CC BY 2.0)

Reign
ca. 680-666 BC
Praenomen
M23
t
L2
t
<
rasR4
t p
ib
n
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Sehotepenibre
He Pleases the Heart of Re
Nomen
G39N5
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p
D37
W1t
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Padibastet
The Gift of Bast
Legacy
Died 666 BC
Burial Unknown
For other pages by this name, see Padibastet.

Sehotepenibre Padibastet III (transliteration: pꜢ-dỉ-bꜢst.t, meaning: "The Gift of Bast"), Hellenized as Pedubast or Pedubastis, is an ancient Egyptian non-dynastic local Pharaoh during the Third Intermediate Period. He ruled from Tanis over a large territory in the eastern Nile Delta. Padibastet III was a Lower Egyptian contemporary of Taharqa of the Twenty-fifth Dynasty.

Padibastet III came to rule as a local kinglet after the collapse of the 22nd Dynasty in Lower Egypt. He appears to have been the Padibastet cited by the Assyrians to have ruled Tanis at the time of the Assyrian invasion under Esarhaddon and then Ashurbanipal in 666 BC.[1][2] He was made a vassal of Assyria under their short-lived hegemony in Egypt.[3] Padibastet was probably among the Delta kinglets who plotted with Taharqa against Assyrian occupation and were subsequently executed and replaced by governors loyal to Assyria.[4]

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References[]

  1. Kitchen 1996, p. 396.
  2. Dodson 2019, p. 151.
  3. Dodson 2019, p. 167.
  4. Dodson 2019, p. 168.

Bibliography[]

  • Dodson, A., 2012 (Revised and Updated 2019 Edition): Afterglow of Empire: Egypt from the Fall of the New Kingdom to the Saite Renaissance. The American University in Cairo Press.
  • Kitchen, K.A., 1996: The Third Intermediate Period in Egypt (1100–650 BC). Aris & Phillips Limited, Warminster.
Predecessor:
Gemenefkhonsubak
Pharaoh of Egypt
Non-dynastic
Successor:
Taharqa
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