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Paser
G40A21A51
pꜣ-sr
"The Noble"
Statue Paser CG42164 Legrain

Granite statue of Paser from the Egyptian Museum in Cairo (CG 42164).©

Predecessor:
Nebamun
Vizier of Upper Egypt Successor:
Nehy I
Predecessor:
Hori
High Priest of Amun Successor:
Bakenkhonsu I
Dynasty 19th Dynasty
Pharaoh(s) Seti IRamesses II
Titles High Priest of Amun
Vizier of Upper Egypt
Nomarch of Waset
Mayor of Thebes
Count
Father Nebnetjeru-Tjenry
Mother Meritre
Burial TT106
For other pages by this name, see Paser.

Paser (transliteration: pꜣ-sr, meaning: "The Noble") was the Vizier of Upper Egypt and High Priest of Amun under Pharaoh Ramesses II of the 19th Dynasty during the New Kingdom.[1]

Family[]

Paser was the son of the High Priest of Amun Nebnetjeru-Tjenry and the Chief of the Harem of Amun Meritre. His maternal grandparents are named in his tomb as Aniy and Naia, who apparently came from Memphis.[2] In Paser's tomb a brother Tatia, Steward in the Temple of Ma'at, is mentioned.[2]

Career[]

Paser was part of the close entourage of Seti I's son, the then Prince Ramesses, and a hereditary Prince and Count. Paser held many titles and honors throughout his life. The autobiographical text in Paser's tomb tells us that Menmaatre, i.e. Seti I, elevated Paser to the rank of first companion of the palace, and later promoted him to be chief chamberlain of the Lord of Both Lands and high priest of Great of Magic (Werethekau). Eventually Seti I appointed Paser to be city-governor and vizier. Paser received the tribute of the foreign lands for his king, and he was sent throughout Egypt to calculate the revenue. When Ramesses II took the throne he reappointed Paser as chief chamberlain of the Lord of Both Lands, high priest of Great of Magic and vizier.[3] Among his major works was the construction of the tomb of Seti I in the Valley of the Kings.[2]

Paser held an array of other titles as well according to inscriptions on statues and monuments. He was a dignitary and judge, mouth of Nekhen, prophet of Maat, seal-bearer of the King of Upper and Lower Egypt, superintendent of every work of the king, chief of secrets of the hieroglyphs, etc.[2]

Paser is last attested as vizier in year 21 of Ramesses II, and he may have held this office during the reigns of Seti I and Ramesses II for over 25 years.[3] Eventually Ramesses II appointed Paser as High Priest of Amun in Thebes. A statue of Paser giving his title as high priest was found in the Karnak Cachette. The statue is now in the Cairo Museum (CGC 42156). Paser is said to be a noble and count, the High Priest of Amun, and the superintendent of prophets of all (Theban) gods. A shabti for the high priest Paser is in the University College, London collection.[2]

Burial[]

Bakenkhonsu was buried in his TT106 rock-cut tomb at Sheikh Abd el-Qurna, which is part of the Theban Necropolis. The exterior facade of the tomb includes the cartouche of Ramesses II. Scenes include Paser and his mother Merytre as mummies and a canopic shrine with its jars being libated by his brother Titia.

Several pillars in the hall are decorated. Paser is shown before Amenhotep I and Ahmose Nefertari. On the same pillar Paser's brother Titia is depicted again offering before Paser and his mother Merytre. Another pillar depicts Paser and his parents worshipping the Gods. There are scenes before Osiris and Maat, his parents before Wenennufer, and Paser participating in a Valley Festival, praising Re and Amun.

The texts include a hymn to Osiris, the Song of the Harper, a biographical text and praise of King Ramesses II. Funerary objects include two canopic jars, which are now in the Cairo Museum (CGC 4325 and 4326). One of the jars shows Selqet and Duamutef, the other Isis and Qebehsenuf. A shabti for Paser is now in the collection in Berlin (Berlin 367), while three other shabtis are in the collection of University College in London (nos 93-94-95).[2]

References[]

  1. Rice 1999, p. 146–147.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 Kitchen 1996.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Frood 2007.

Bibliography[]

  • Frood, E., 2007: Biographical Texts from Ramessid Egypt.
  • Kitchen, K.A., 1996: Ramesside Inscriptions, Translated & Annotated, Translations. Vol. III. Blackwell Publishers.
  • Rice, M., 1999: Who's Who in Ancient Egypt. Routledge.
Predecessor:
Nebamun
Vizier of Upper Egypt
19th Dynasty
Successor:
Nehy I


Predecessor:
Hori
High Priest of Amun
19th Dynasty
Successor:
Bakenkhonsu I
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