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Sitdjehuty
G26Z4G39t
sꜣt-ḏḥwty
"Daughter of Thoth"
Sitdjehuty

Mask of Sitdjehuty at the State Museum of Egyptian Art in Munich.©Hans Ollermann

Dynasty 17th Dynasty
18th Dynasty
Pharaoh(s) Tao II
Kamose
Ahmose II
Titles King's Wife
King's Daughter
King's Sister
Father Ahmose I
Mother Tetisheri
Spouse(s) Tao II
Issue Ahmose
Burial Known?

Sitdjehuty (Ancient Egyptian: sꜣt-ḏḥwtj, "Daughter of Thoth") was an ancient Egyptian Princess and King's Wife of the late Seventeenth Dynasty during the Second Intermediate Period.

Titles[]

Sitdjehuty is known to have held the titles; King's Daughter (sꜣt-nsw), King's Sister (snt-nsw), and King's Wife (ḥmt-nsw).[1]

Family[]

Sitdjehuty was a daughter of Pharaoh Ahmose I and Queen Tetisheri. She was a sister-wife of Pharaoh Tao II.[2] The queens Ahhotep I and Ahmose-Inhapi were her sisters.

Sitdjehuty is mentioned on the mummy shroud of her daughter Princess Ahmose, which was found in the QV47 rock-cut tomb in the Valley of the Queens. Ahmose is called the King's Daughter and Queen's Sister, which suggests that Ahmose was the daughter of Tao II and Sitdjehuti.[1]

Burial[]

Sitdjehuty's original tomb remains unknown. Her mummy was discovered around 1820, along with its coffin, golden mask, a heart scarab, and linens donated by her niece Queen Ahmose-Nefertari. The linen is inscribed with the text:

"Given in the favour of the god's wife, king's wife and king's mother Ahmose-Nefertari may she live, so Sitdjehuty."[3]

Sitdjehuty's coffin lid is now held at the State Museum of Egyptian Art in Munich while her funerary mask is located at the British Museum (EA 29770) in London.

References[]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Grajetzki 2005.
  2. Dodson & Hilton 2004.
  3. Quirke & Spencer 1992, p. 188-189.

Bibliography[]

  • Dodson, A./Hilton, D., 2004: The Complete Royal Families of Ancient Egypt. Thames & Hudson, London.
  • Grajetzki, W., 2005: Ancient Egyptian Queens: A Hieroglyphic Dictionary. Golden House Publications, London.
  • Quirke, S./Spencer, J., 1992: The British Museum Book of Egypt. BMP, London.
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