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Preceded by:
Nimlot
Pharaoh of Egypt
Non-dynastic
Succeeded by:
Padinemty (?)
Thutemhat
Djehutyemhat
Statue CG42212 Legrain

Statue of the priest Tjanhesret, bearing the cartouches of Thutemhat, at the Cairo Museum, CG 42212. (Public domain)

Reign
ca. 715 BC
Praenomen
M23
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raxprnfrN28
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Neferkheperre-Khakhau
Perfect Manifestation of Re,
Radiant of Crowns
Nomen
G39N5
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Thutemhat
Thoth is Foremost
Legacy
Burial Unknown

Neferkheperre-Khakhau Thutemhat or Djehutyemhat (transliteration: ḏḥwty-m-ḥt, meaning: "Thoth is Foremost") is an ancient Egyptian non-dynastic local Pharaoh during the Third Intermediate Period. He ruled from Hermopolis over a large territory in Upper Egypt. Thutemhat was an Upper Egyptian contemporary and probably vassal of the Nubian rulers Piye and Shabataka of the Twenty-fifth Dynasty.

Name[]

Thutemhat took the throne name (or prenomen) Neferkheperre (transliteration: nfr-ḫpr-rꜤ, meaning: "Perfect Manifestation of Re"). Aidan Dodson takes note that "it is interesting that Thutemhat's prenomen echoes that of Akhenaten ('Neferkheperure'), whose city of Tell el-Amarna lay almost opposite Hermopolis".[1] Thutemhat complemented his throne name with the epithet Khakhau (ḫꜤ-ḫꜤw, "Radiant of Crowns"). His nomen does not include any epithets. His name is thus realised as Neferkheperre-Khakhau Thutemhat.

Attestations[]

Thutemhat is known from the appearance of his cartouches on a block statue depicting the priest Tjanhesret, found in Luxor in 1909 and now in the Cairo Museum (CG 42212). Thutemhat is also mentioned on a bronze naos-shaped amulet of Amun-Re of unknown provenance – possibly from Thebes – and now in the British Museum (EA11015).[2][3][4]

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References[]

  1. Dodson 2019, p. 272, n. 61.
  2. Spencer 1986, p. 198-201.
  3. Kitchen 1996, p. 109, 331.
  4. The bronze naos-shaped amulet EA11015 at the British Museum.

Bibliography[]

  • Dodson, A., 2012 (Revised and Updated 2019 Edition): Afterglow of Empire: Egypt from the Fall of the New Kingdom to the Saite Renaissance. The American University in Cairo Press.
  • Kitchen, K.A., 1996: The Third Intermediate Period in Egypt (1100–650 BC). Aris & Phillips Limited, Warminster.
  • Spencer, P.A./Spencer, A.J., 1986: Notes on Late Libyan Period. JEA 72.
Predecessor:
Nimlot
Pharaoh of Egypt
Non-dynastic
Successor:
Padinemty (?)
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