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Tiye-Mereniset
Tiy-Merenese
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tỉy-mr-n-st
"Tiye, Beloved of Iset"
Tiye-Mereniset

Slab with relief of queen Tiye-Mereniset and her cartouche from Abydos, now in the Cairo Museum (JE 36339).©

Dynasty 20th Dynasty
Pharaoh(s) MerenptahSetnakhte
Titles King's Great Wife
King's Mother
Father Merenptah (?)
Spouse(s) Setnakhte
Issue Ramesses III, Tyti (?)
Burial Unknown
For other pages by this name, see Tiye.

Tiye-Mereniset or Tiy-Merenese[1] (ancient Egyptian: tỉy-mr-n-st, "Tiye, Beloved of Iset") was an ancient Egyptian Queen of the Twentieth Dynasty during the New Kingdom.

Family[]

Tiye-Mereniset is the only known wife of Pharaoh Setnakhte. She is attested as "King's Mother" on a stela from Abydos (JE 20395) which shows a priest named Meresyotef adoring Setnakhte and Tiye-Mereniset with their son Ramesses III making offerings. Tiye-Mereniset also appears on blocks found in Abydos which were reused in other buildings.[2][3] Her husband's daughter, Tyti, might have been hers since no other wives of Setnakhte are known.

She is speculated to perhaps be a daughter of Pharaoh Merenptah, due to both their names containing the Meren[..] part and Merenptah's mother, queen and a probable daughter also have names dedicated to Isis. If this were the case, Tiye-Mereniset's marriage to Setnakhte would explain the latter's rise to kingship as Merenptah's son-in-law.

Burial[]

The whereabouts of Tiye-Mereniset's tomb and mummy remain unknown. A mummy known as Unknown Woman D, found in a cache of royal mummies in KV35 in the Valley of the Kings, might be hers. However, Tausret has also been proposed as the mummy's identity.

References[]

  1. Tyldesley 2006.
  2. Grajetzki 2005.
  3. Dodson & Hilton 2004.

Bibliography[]

  • Dodson, A./Hilton, D., 2004: The Complete Royal Families of Ancient Egypt. Thames & Hudson, London.
  • Grajetzki, W., 2005: Ancient Egyptian Queens: a Hieroglyphic Dictionary. Golden House Publications, London.
  • Tyldesley, J., 2006: Chronicle of the Queens of Egypt. Thames & Hudson, London.
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